Sunday, February 15, 2009

MANATEE CHALLENGE #5


( or When the secret to science means "just keep kicking!" )

- there are no links or pics, we missed the satelliete today-

It’s Sunday Night and we’ve just finished dinner…everyone is HUNGRY. We were in the water twice today and held class twice. We trained in coral species identification and then practiced in the “field” this morning. We swam out to a patch reef from the beach where Columbus landed. Wow! It’s just a bit weird swimming around coral where Columbus dropped anchor. This afternoon, we explored some seagrass beds – turtle grass and eel grass - and some smaller reefs. There were too many lion fish that are not supposed to be here. Hurricane Andrew is said to have caused their release from aquaria in south Florida. They are very poisonous. I will send pictures.

Tomorrow we will begin gathering data. (1)We will have to do a coral transect counting the number of coral that are being “bleached” in ten square meter areas. (2)We have to determine what percentage is “bleached.” (3)We have to measure air temperature over a specific coral position, and water temperature directly above the same place. (4)We have to determine the water clarity using a secchi dish (look up secchi dish). (5)We have to do a point-intercept in a one square meter of coral reef to determine how much hard coral, soft coral, sponge, algae, sand , rock, other ( stuff that doesn’t belong)

That would be FIVE (5) science projects – all while swimming!!!!

MANATEE CHALLENGE NUMBER 5.

Design a data table for these experiments. What data do you need to record? How would you record it? Select just one of these experiments and describe what difficulties or problems you think you might have doing that project. (BIG BONUS HERE GANG)

An excellent comment response would be; “Which of these projects do you think is the hardest to do? I’ll let you know which one it turns out to be.

59 Comments:

At February 16, 2009 at 9:15 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hi Mr. V. It sounds like you are busy learning new things and working hard. It is fun reading your blog and I look forward to more.
Mrs. V.

 
At February 16, 2009 at 9:43 AM , Anonymous Kacy said...

My guess for hardest is determining H20 temp of air and water over specific position...?

 
At February 16, 2009 at 9:58 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

the data i need to record whould be hard coral, soft coral, sponge, algae, sand , rock, and stuff that does not belong i think experiment number 5 whould be the hardest one beacuse you whould have so much coral in just one small area and you whould have two do that for not just one area but for miles and then there whould have to be some one to Record the data and that person could get the info wrong .how i whould Record the data whould be useing a underwater Camera so later on i could go back and veiw the pics Witch in my case would be the ease and fastest way

 
At February 16, 2009 at 7:14 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Mr. V,
How I wish I was there with you. It all sounds "hard" expecially "point-intercept"

In the transect counting of "bleached" coral, how deep is the water where you are counting this? How long is your transect line? Is this where you are also measuring the air temp and water temp or is it at another location?

Can't wait to see ALL the pictures when you get back!

Cheers,
Ms. Gibson

 
At February 17, 2009 at 10:00 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Rick,
We are testing the ability of the students to blog from here in the library. It seems to be working under the anonymous profile. If we run into difficulties my plan is to upload the student response onto a thumb drive and upload them all by class period. Hoping to hear you today over skype. Remember my address is nancy.millichamp
Nancy

 
At February 17, 2009 at 10:56 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

it sounds like you are having fun but not eating enough

chance
red

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:13 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest part of this experiment would be to point-intercept in a one square meter of coral reef to determine how much hard coral,soft coral,sponge,algae,sand,rock,and other (stuff that doesnt belong).



RED/Braxton

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:14 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

whats the hardest expierment 1 or 4.

Cody red

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:15 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

whats the hardest expierment 1-4.

Cody red

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:19 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I thank that when u r trying to count the persent of bleached coral. i thank that it would be hard because is is going to take some math to do it.

CRYSTIAN
RED

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:56 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

out of these projects the one we think is the hardest is (1)We will have to do a coral transect counting the number of coral that are being “bleached” in ten square meter areas, becasuse if you miss one or two bleached coral than your data will be off.

emily and kristine red

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

hey Mr.V i think the hrdest one is number 3 but im still wondering which one is the easyest

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I believe that the hardest one is determining the water and air temp at the same time. I think that you will run into difficulties because the temps in the water and air may change over time and cause problems in finding the right temp.

Jordan
Orange


Jordan
Orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey mr v i think the hardest one is trying to find the water temp and the air temp at the same time. I also think that the water temp has a big difference on how the the coral survives. It sounds like your having fun.

bryn orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think that determineing the precentage of coral will be the hardest


Gina
Orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:08 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think that the hardest experiment is calculating the specific air tempeture over a coral position
Joey
orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:09 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be the number of bleached coral because it may be hard to count them or to determine the bleached coral from the un-bleached coral.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:12 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Your hardest experiment might be measuring the amount of bleached coral in 1 square meter.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 1:35 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The hardest to do is to bleach.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:13 PM , Anonymous Cassidy~ green said...

Mr V.
Sounds like you are having fun in the Bahamas! I think that the hardest part would be figuring out the finding the % of bleached coral. You would have to count everything and do alot of math! But it sounds like a lot of fun so enjoy yourself! (even figuring out percentages =])

Cassidy <3
Green =]

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:14 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think the hardest thing two do whould be recorrding the number of coral that must take so long and you whould have two be so good at rembering what kind of coral you found you whould also have two make sure your patner gets the info right
kerrilyn green

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:19 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think it would be really hard to count the number of coral. I think that because there can be alot of coral in the same place and sometimes you would have to miscount. This could be like counting pennies in a jar.
Counting coral can be very frustrating.

AEDEN
GREEN

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:21 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think the hardest experimente would be testing the water clarity with a scechii disc. ithink this would be a hard experiment for me because i do not have a scechii disc and i do not know how to use one.

alex
green

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:22 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that having to do a coral transect counting the number of coral that are being “bleached” in ten square meter areas would be the hardest. Why? Because you have to be very careful of where you are swimming to make sure you don't touch the coral, or else it would die.

-Emily! =]
Green.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:22 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the hardest thing to measure is the percentage of the bleached coral. It looks fun making a data table for all of this data and I wish I was up thier. The easiest part of this project is doing the water tempature. Because alls that you have to do is stick a thermomature into the ocean and calculate the tempature. It sounds fun to be up there where history was made and created. I belive that it would be hard to measure the bleached coral because you can't touch the coral or it will die and that is very bad.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:23 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest part to measure would be to measure the water temperature because the water temperature is warm in some places and cold in others.


Dane ☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻☺☻
Green☺☻

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:26 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest thing to calculate would be the percantage of bleached coral. I think this because finding the amount of coral will be hard and finding the amount of bleached coral will be hard so finding the amount of bleached coral will be extremely hard.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:27 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest thing to measure is the persentage of bleached coral. Because you have to calculate how much coral there is in your area and then you can find the pecentage of bleached choral. A problem that might arise from this is if you get the wrong number of total coral. Then you will get the wrong number of bleached coral.

craig
green

 
At February 17, 2009 at 2:27 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think it would be hardest to find the percentage of bleached coral because I think it would be hard to know what bleached coral looked like.


Zack Green☻

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:09 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

MR. V,
I think that the hardest experiment to measure would be measuring the hard coral because if you touch the coral it will die. then if you keep touching coral it will become endangered!

~Sara~, blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:09 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be finding the percentage of the bleached coral.

~Tristan
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:11 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

MR V,
I think that the hardest experiment to measure would be measuring the hard coral because if you touch the coral it will die. then if you keep touching coral it will become endangered!

~Sara~, blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:13 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think it would be the hardest experiment to count the coral reefs that are being bleached because theres probablt alot of then and you never know how long it would take to count them. When coral is bleached it means that it is slowly dieing.
colette blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:14 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

MR V,
I think that the hardest experiment to measure would be measuring the hard coral because if you touch the coral it will die. then if you keep touching coral it will become endangered!

~Sara~, blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:14 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think counting the bleached coral would be the hardest experiment because you have to look at the coral and identify it as if the color or texture of it has changed. When coral is bleached it is slowly dying.

How is coral bleached?

Alyssa
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:14 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest part of the experiment is to measure the amount of soft coral. Why, because its hard to tell the difference between hard and soft and its everywhere.

Braeden Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:15 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you measured the water clarity the problems you might have would be different clearness (turbitity?) in different areas. And the secchi dish might measure it (water clarity) incorrectly. I think that measuring the water clarity would be the hardest. (I've done it before at my old school)

~ Sammi, Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:15 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think counting the bleached coral would be the hardest experiment because you have to look at the coral and identify it as if the color or texture of it has changed. When coral is bleached it is slowly dying.

How is coral bleached?

Alyssa
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:15 PM , OpenID angelika said...

Mr.V,

Its Angelika And Keely :)

We think that the hardest experiment to do is finding the the percent of bleached coral although the bleach white corals stand out we think it would be pretty hard to find all the bleached coral in your area and then convert the data into a percent. We also think that finding the water clarity would be hard because we dont know how to use the secchi disk and how to measure how far the disk goes down before it is no longer visible.

KEELY !
ANGELIKA
u
l
b

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:17 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

In my opinion the hardest part of the experiment would be to measure how much sand you saw because i'm not sure if I should measure per gram, per grain, per square foot, etc, etc ...

Cameron
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 3:18 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the second experiment will be the hardest to do.(Do a point-intercept in a one square meter of coral reef to determine how much hard coral, soft coral, sponge, algae, sand , and rock there are in the point intercept.

I think that this experiment will be the hardest because I kouw its hard to measure how much sand there is in one point intercept.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 4:00 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Its going to be hard for me because i dont have any data.

Andrew
-Violet

 
At February 17, 2009 at 4:04 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

i am picking the hard coral project. this will be hard because i don't have coral that lives in the ocean. wich means i can't see if it's hard.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 4:09 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The hardest thing for me to do is counting the bleached coral. You have to count all of the coral and record them on a data table.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 5:26 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest part would be examining the sand. I dont understand how you measure the sand. how do you do it? Another thing that seems hard is to point intersect. This is if you are off at all . Then you dont truely know if the corals are getting better or worse.

alexis <3
blue◄

 
At February 17, 2009 at 5:54 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment to do would be finding the percent of bleached coral.

~Ryan
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 5:57 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be
finding the percent of coral bleached corals.

~Ryan
Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 6:19 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

the hardest experiment is the percent of bleached coral and the h2o tempature and the air tempeture.

Ayla Gosselin
orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:03 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be the water clarity. The problems you might have could be the waves. If theres big waves there then it might push the secchi dish. Another problem could be that its only unclear at the time you look at it. Like if a fish stirred up some sand, or released some toxin that would make the water cloudy. I think it would be a good idea to check the temperatures and turbidity daily. So I think that checking the clarity or point intercepting would be the hardest.

~ Sammi, Blue

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:39 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be trying to find out how much percent of coral is bleached.

Marquis
orange

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:50 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the second experiment will be the hardest. ( Do a point-intercept in a one square meter of coral reef to determine how much hard coral, soft coral, sponge, algae, sand , and rock there is in each point intercept).

I think that this will be the hardest experiment because I think that it will be hard to measure how much sand and algea there is in each point intercept.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I belive that the hardest part of these projects will be counting the percent of bleached coral. I also belive that the easiest project will be the water tempature. I belive that because alls you would have to do is go under water and place a thermomatre inside that water to record that. Also it will take and require good math and good math skills. It looks really hard and also fun to be out there. If I was doing that I would not be able to do the math involved in counting the percentage and percent of the bleached coral.

Aaron
Green

 
At February 19, 2009 at 3:02 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the hardest experiment would be to measure air temperature over a specific coral position because, you are using a tool and measuring what is going on underwater. Doing this you would have to spend alot of time underwater viewing coral!

What is the hardest experiment Mr.V!

~Alyssa
~Blue

 
At February 19, 2009 at 3:07 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the hardest experiment would be to measure air temperature over a specific coral position because, you are using a tool and measuring what is going on underwater. Doing this you would have to spend alot of time underwater viewing and measuring the temperature of coral!

What is the hardest experiment Mr.V!

~Alyssa
~Blue

 
At February 19, 2009 at 3:08 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that the hardest experiment would be to measure air temperature over a specific coral position because, you are using a tool and measuring what is going on underwater. Doing this you would have to spend alot of time underwater viewing and measuring the temperature of coral!

What is the hardest experiment Mr.V!

~Alyssa
~Blue

 
At February 19, 2009 at 3:10 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

MR.VOSKUIL!!! you should not be touching this coral! I thought you said that is you touch the coral then you kill that whole section? To grow just that part of the coral could of took more than ten years to grow! and you just killed it.I hope you were touching algae MR !! Be careful out there.

<3 Angelika & KeEly!
U
L
B

 
At February 19, 2009 at 5:29 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would have to be to measure air temperature over a specific coral position because, you are using a tool and measuring what is going on underwater. Doing this you would have to spend alot of time underwater wiewing and measuring the temperature of coral.

-Alyssa
Blue

 
At February 19, 2009 at 6:25 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Doing a coral transect and counting the number of coral that get bleached in ten square meter areas sounds hard. Think about all the coral.
Darren Blue

 
At February 22, 2009 at 10:22 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the hardest experiment would be to measure the temperature over a specific coral position.

Simon,
Blue

 

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